Friday, July 21, 2017

Fatal Drownings in Pools Involving Young Children Decreases By 17 Percent Nationwide Since 2010

"A new report released today by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) shows that the number of reported fatal child drownings in swimming pools involving children younger than 5—the most vulnerable population—has decreased 17 percent nationwide since 2010, the year our Pool Safely public education campaign was launched. Despite the decrease, fatal and non-fatal child drownings in pools and spas continue to pose a public health challenge across the United States. In national and local media interviews today, CPSC Acting Chairman Ann Marie Buerkle urged families to be vigilant when children are in and around the water this summer.
“Despite the positive decline in numbers, there are still far too many children who drown each year in pools and spas across the country,” said Acting Chairman Buerkle. “Swimming should be fun and a great way for families to be active, so long as everyone knows how to pool safely.  As a mother, grandmother and registered nurse, I raised my kids, and now my grandkids, with a respect for water. Constant supervision, along with four-sided fencing, knowing how to perform CPR and teaching children how to swim are all important steps to continuing the decline in child drownings.”..."

Youth drownings

Crime in the United States: Preliminary January - June 2016

"Preliminary figures indicate that law enforcement agencies throughout the nation showed an overall increase of 5.3 percent in the number of violent crimes brought to their attention for the first 6 months of 2016 when compared with figures reported for the same time in 2015. The violent crime category includes murder, rape (revised definition), rape (legacy definition), robbery, and aggravated assault. The number of property crimes in the United States from January to June of 2016 decreased 0.6 percent when compared with data for the same time period in 2015. Property crimes include burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. Arson is also a property crime, but data for arson are not included in property crime totals due to fluctuations in reporting. Figures for 2016 indicate that arson decreased 1.1 percent when compared with 2015 figures for the same time period.
The data presented in Tables 1 and 2 indicate the percent change in offenses known to law enforcement for the first 6 months of 2016 compared with those for the first half of 2015 by population group and region, respectively. Table 3 reflects the percent change in offenses reported within the nation for consecutive years (each year compared to the prior year). Table 4 presents the number of offenses known to law enforcement for agencies with resident populations of 100,000 or more that provided 6 months of complete data for 2016. In addition, Table 4 presents 6 months of 2015 data, where available, as a point of comparison. All data in this Report are preliminary..."

Cime in the U.S.: 2016

Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning Preventio

"When power outages occur after severe weather (such as severe storms, hurricanes or tornadoes), using alternative sources of power can cause carbon monoxide (CO) to build up in a home and poison the people and animals inside.
Every year, at least 430 people die in the U. S. from accidental CO poisoning. Approximately 50,000 people in the U.S. visit the emergency department each year due to accidental CO poisoning. There are steps you can take to help protect yourself and your household from CO poisoning. Change the batteries in your CO detector every six months. If you don’t have a battery-powered or battery back-up CO detector, buy one soon.
CO is found in fumes produced by portable generators, stoves, lanterns, and gas ranges, or by burning charcoal and wood. CO from these sources can build up in enclosed or partially enclosed spaces. People and animals in these spaces can be poisoned and can die from breathing CO.
CO poisoning is entirely preventable. Protect yourself and your family by acting wisely in case of a power outage and learning the symptoms of CO poisoning...."

Carbon Monoxide

Summer Travel 2017

"School is out, work in the office is quieting down, and cold temperatures are a distant memory. It’s time to relax and enjoy the warm, sunny weather. If international travel is part of your summer plans, the CDC Travelers’ Health website is a great first stop to get prepared.

Before You Go

  • Visit your doctor or a travel medicine specialist, ideally 4–6 weeks before your trip, to get any vaccines or medicines you may need. Go to the Destinations website to check the vaccines and medicines list specific to your destination. Even if you are leaving soon, a visit to a travel medicine doctor is valuable. The doctor can counsel you on ways you can reduce your risk of getting sick or hurt while traveling.
  • Pack a Travel Health Kit. Include prescription and over-the-counter medicines, sunscreen, alcohol-based sanitizer, first aid supplies, health insurance card, insect repellent, and condoms.
  • Check for any current Travel Health Notices. These notices will inform you about health issues related to disease outbreaks, special events or gatherings, natural disasters, or other conditions at your destination.
  • Check the US Department of State website for information on security risks. Register with the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program so the US embassy or consulate can contact you in an emergency...."

Summer Travel

Community HealthSim

"The Community HealthSim is a violence prevention tool on CDC’s VetoViolence website. This game-like experience demonstrates the connections between violence and community issues, such as struggling businesses and schools, overcrowded jails, and long wait hours in the emergency room.
The simulation puts you in the driver’s seat of Vetoville. You can explore the town from the perspective of a “special advisor”—brought in to determine how to spend the town’s limited resources to improve the quality of life for everyone who lives there..."

Community HealthSim

Globe had 2nd warmest year to date and 3rd warmest June on record

"Climate by the Numbers

JUNE
The average global temperature set in June 2017 was 1.48 degrees F above the 20th-century average of 59.9 degrees, according to scientists from NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information. This average temperature was the third highest for June in the 1880-2017 record, behind June 2015 (second) and a record-breaking June 2016. June 2017 marks the 41st consecutive June and the 390th consecutive month with temperatures at least nominally above the 20th-century average.

*Year to date | January through June 2017

The year-to-date average temperature was 1.64 degrees F above the 20th-century average of 56.3 degrees. This was the second-warmest for this period, 0.29 of a degree behind the record set in 2016..."
Record warm weather

CBO cost estimates: H.R. 1628 American Health Care Act of 2017

"The Congressional Budget Office and the staff of the Joint Committee on Taxation (JCT) have completed an estimate of the direct spending and revenue effects of H.R. 1628, the American Health Care Act of 2017, as passed by the House of Representatives. CBO and JCT estimate that enacting that version of H.R. 1628 would reduce the cumulative federal deficit over the 2017-2026 period by $119 billion. That amount is $32 billion less than the estimated net savings for the version of H.R. 1628 that was posted on the website of the House Committee on Rules on March 22, 2017, incorporating manager’s amendments 4, 5, 24, and 25. (CBO issued a cost estimate for that earlier version of the legislation on March 23, 2017.) 1

In comparison with the estimates for the previous version of the act, under the Housepassed act, the number of people with health insurance would, by CBO and JCT’s estimates, be slightly higher and average premiums for insurance purchased individually—that is, nongroup insurance—would be lower, in part because the insurance, on average, would pay for a smaller proportion of health care costs. In addition, the agencies expect that some people would use the tax credits authorized by the act to purchase policies that would not cover major medical risks and that are not counted as insurance in this cost estimate..."
CBO costs estimates: American Health Care Act

Monday, July 17, 2017

Drawing Justice: the Art of Courtroom Illustration

"Drawing Justice: The Art of Courtroom Illustration showcases the Library’s extensive collections of original art by talented artists hired by both newspapers and television to capture the personal dynamics of legal trials. Skilled at quickly conveying both individual likenesses and the atmosphere of the courtroom, these artists reveal, in intimate detail, the dramatic and, at times, mundane aspects of trial proceedings.

The illustrations on display represent court cases dating from 1964 to the present day. These cases influenced how Americans perceive race and race relations, religion, gender issues, political and corporate corruption, international relations, and the role of celebrities in society. The corresponding drawings are poignant images of people from all walks of life during the last fifty years of court history, observed in their most vulnerable moments. While artistic styles vary, each artist brings the theater of the courtroom to life, capturing gestures, appearance, and relationships in a way that humanizes defendants, plaintiffs, lawyers, judges, and witnesses..."
Drawing justice

Democracy Promotion: An Objective of U.S. Foreign Assistance

"Promoting democratic institutions, processes, and values has long been a U.S. foreign policy objective, though the priority given to this objective has been inconsistent. World events, competing priorities, and political change within the United States all shape the attention and resources provided to democracy promotion efforts and influence whether such efforts focus on supporting fair elections abroad, strengthening civil society, promoting rule of law and human rights, or other aspects of democracy promotion.

Proponents of democracy promotion often assert that such efforts are essential to global development and U.S. security because stable democracies tend to have better economic growth and stronger protection of human rights, and are less likely to go to war with one another. Critics contend that U.S. relations with foreign countries should focus exclusively on U.S. interests and stability in the world order. U.S. interest in global stability, regardless of the democratic nature of national political systems, could discourage U.S. support for democratic transitions—the implementation of which is uncertain and may lead to more, rather than less, instability..." 
Democracy promotion

Friday, July 14, 2017

Nationwide Sweep Targets Enablers of Opioid Epidemic

"Federal officials today announced charges against more than 400 individuals—including doctors, nurses, and licensed medical professionals—for their roles in fraud schemes involving about $1.3 billion in false Medicare billings.
The coordinated nationwide sweep by more than 1,000 law enforcement personnel—operating as part of the Medicare Fraud Strike Force—is the largest action to date. Of the 412 individuals charged, one in four cases involved opioid-related crimes, underscoring the scope of what federal officials are calling a drug-abuse epidemic that is killing approximately 91 Americans every day..."
Opioid epidemic

Harmful Algal Blooms


"Harmful algal blooms can produce toxins that are dangerous to people, animals, and the environment. Learn what harmful algal blooms are, how you and your pets can avoid them, and what CDC is doing to protect the public’s health.
Warm weather brings many happy occasions: picnics, ballgames, and back yard fun. It also is a time when microscopic plant-like organisms – algae and cyanobacteria – are more likely to overgrow in rivers, lakes, and oceans.
These overgrowths, called algal blooms, occur across the country. Sometimes they are just eyesores – an unpleasant scum or mats of green, red, blue, or brown organisms in the water that look or smell bad. Sometimes they also cause harm to people, animals, and the environment. In this case, they are known as harmful algal blooms. But you can’t tell if a bloom is harmful just by looking at it..."

Algal blooms

Worker Hearing Loss

"Did you know that within every industry sector, there are workers at risk for work-related hearing loss? Work-related hearing loss is common and preventable. Learn more about hearing loss within your industry and how to prevent it.

Is work-related hearing loss a major problem?

In the United States, hearing loss is the third most common chronic physical condition after high blood pressure and arthritis. It is more common than diabetes, vision trouble, or cancer. Not surprisingly, hearing loss is among the most common work-related illnesses. Over 11% of the working population has hearing difficulty, and nearly one out of four cases of worker hearing difficulty are caused by work-related exposures. These exposures include loud noise and chemicals causing damage to the inner ear (ototoxic chemicals). Ototoxic chemicals include organic solvents like trichloroethylene, heavy metals like mercury and lead, and asphyxiants like carbon monoxide..."
Hearing loss

Crime Against Persons With Disabilities, 2009-2015 - Statistical Tables

"Presents 2009-2015 National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) estimates of nonfatal violent crime (rape or sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, and simple assault) against persons age 12 or older with disabilities. Disabilities are classified according to six limitations: hearing, vision, cognitive, ambulatory, self-care, and independent living. The report compares the victimization of persons with and without disabilities living in noninstitutionalized households, including distributions by sex, race, Hispanic origin, age, disability type, and other victim characteristics. It also includes crime characteristics, such as victim-offender relationship, time of crime, reporting to police, and use of victim services agencies. NCVS data were combined with data from the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey to generate victimization rates.
Highlights:
  • During the 5-year aggregate period from 2011 to 2015, for each age group measured except persons age 65 or older, the rate of violent victimization against persons with disabilities was at least 2.5 times the unadjusted rate for those without disabilities.
  • Among those with disabilities, persons ages 12 to 15 (144.1 per 1,000 age 12 or older) had the highest rate of violent victimization among all age groups measured.
  • The rate of violent victimization against males with disabilities was 31.8 per 1,000, compared to 14.1 per 1,000 males without disabilities.
  • For females with disabilities, the rate of violent victimization was 32.8 per 1,000, compared to 11.4 per 1,000 females without disabilities.
  • Males and females had similar rates of total violent victimization in every disability type measured, except independent living disabilities..."

Disability statistics

BEA Releases New Statistics on Foreign Direct Investments Made in the U.S.

"The Bureau of Economic Analysis today released statistics detailing the amount and type of new direct investments made in the United States by foreign investors in 2016, 2015 and 2014. The data released today includes information on investments broken out by industry, state and type of investment made – creating a new U.S. business or acquiring or expanding an existing one..."
Foreign direct investments


Monday, July 10, 2017

Protect Your Baby from Group B Strep!

"All pregnant women should get a group B strep test when they are 35–37 weeks pregnant. Babies can get very sick and even die if their mothers pass group B strep bacteria to them during childbirth.
If you are pregnant, talk with your doctor or midwife about getting a group B strep (GBS) test. CDC recommends getting it when you are 35–37 weeks pregnant. The test shows if you are carrying group B streptococcal bacteria, which you can pass to your baby during childbirth. If you carry this bacteria, you need an antibiotic during labor to keep your baby from getting sick..."

Group B Strep